Motivation, Job Satisfaction and Sales Enablement

 
hertzberg-kuvitus.png

It goes without saying that a salesperson’s job isn’t the easiest task in the world. After all, their ultimate goal is to generate revenue. Often that means reaching goals which at first can seem daunting or even almost impossible. For a salesperson to push through sales cycle after another, while staying engaged and motivated, they need incentives. You can motivate them using the traditional methods of incentives and provisions, but also with more modern methods, like constructive feedback and opportunities to improve oneself.

Psychologist Frederick Herzberg developed the two-factor theory, which looks at how positive and negative factors affect work performance independently from one another. Some factors improve the motivation of an employee, like a sense of personal improvement or achievement,performance based salaries and social status. These, according to the theory, are called motivators. Other factors, like a decent work computer, sufficient base pay or even air conditioning, don’t improve motivation, but their absence has a negative effect on job satisfaction. These are called hygiene factors. While motivators answer the question “why do I work hard?” hygienic factors answer the question “why do I work here?” which is why employers need to not only consider motivation, but also the work environment.

While motivators answer the question “why do I work hard?” hygienic factors answer the question “why do I work here?” which is why employers need to not only consider motivation, but also the work environment.

hertzberg.png

We’re looking at Herzberg’s theory in the context of Sales Enablement tools. Should they be considered motivators or hygiene factors? In principle, sales enablement tools would be considered hygiene factors. The tools enable salespeople to do their jobs in a more flexible way and save time from creating or searching for materials, allowing them to concentrate more on engaging the customer. In this case the tools don’t act as motivators, but not having them slows work down, which in turn hurts job satisfaction.

But what if Sales Enablement tools were considered motivators? The absence of these tools doesn’t hurt job satisfaction, because salespeople can still do their job as they did before. Having the tools, on the other hand, increases motivation. If salespeople know that they don’t have to worry about finding materials, whether materials are up to date or how to present them, they can concentrate on their actual jobs. This way they have more time to try and reach their personal goals like quotas, provisions and personal improvement.

Since definitions of Sales Enablement and the tools of the trade are various, trying to bundle them all into either motivators or hygiene factors isn’t realistic or reasonable. In any case, however, they can offer real value to any organization. Whether the right Sales Enablement tools work as motivators in themselves or help keep job satisfaction on form, they can certainly affect what’s most important: the bottom line.